Fiscal sustainability with non-renewable resources.
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Fiscal sustainability with non-renewable resources.

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Published by International Monetary Fund in Washington, D.C .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

SeriesIMF working paper -- WP/98/26
ContributionsInternational Monetary Fund.
The Physical Object
Pagination36 p. ;
Number of Pages36
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18679975M

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approach to public sector sustainability (see the IMF Government Financial Statistics manual). Section X discusses non-renewable natural resources. Section XI discusses how the Contingent Claims Approach (CCA) may be applied to public debt sustainability. The section extends recent work by Gray, Bodie, and Merton () and. This paper assesses sustainable fiscal behavior in an economy where wealth is derived predominantly from a non-renewable resource. It explores the issue in a simple dynamic framework that highlights the structural weaknesses in the underlying budgetary position, takes into account the rate of depletion of a country's natural resource base, and examines the impact of changes in a country's. This paper proposes a framework for assessing fiscal sustainability in heavily indebted countries dependent on exhaustible resources, with reference to Gabon. . Fiscal Federalism of Non-Renewable Natural Resources: Principles and Practices of Revenue Sharing and Equalization Research (PDF Available) October with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

nonrenewable resources seems to support the widely held view that the extractive industries cannot be supportive of the concept of sustainable development. A closer examination of the issue, however, reveals a different perspective. Nonrenewable resources, in particular mineral resources, are necessary for the economic well-being of our Size: KB. Non-Renewable Resources, Fiscal Rules, and Human Capital Paul Levine Giovanni Melina Harun Onder Finance and Markets Global Practice Group June WPS more desirable when fiscal sustainability concerns are taken into consideration. Finally, a balanced composition is the preferred structure of investment, given the permanent File Size: 2MB. Downloadable! This paper proposes a framework for assessing fiscal sustainability in heavily indebted countries dependent on exhaustible resources, with reference to Gabon. It finds that fiscal sustainability could be achieved by: (i) developing a fiscal rule for the non-oil primary fiscal balance compatible with an objective for reducing the debt-to-non-oil GDP ratio; (ii) introducing a. A non-renewable resource (also called a finite resource) is a natural resource that cannot be readily replaced by natural means at a quick enough pace to keep up with example is carbon-based fossil fuel. The original organic matter, with the aid of heat and pressure, becomes a fuel such as oil or gas. Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas.

5. Conservation and sustainability 6. Resources availability: scarcity views 7. Global models 8. Conclusions Glossary Bibliography Biographical Sketches Summary In the universe of natural resources, minerals are unique in the sense of their non-renewable profile. Their deposits are finite, either physically or economically, and this. Home > Policy Research Working Papers > Non-Renewable Resources, Fiscal Rules, and Human Capital. Sustainability is the ability to exist constantly. In the 21st century, it refers generally to the capacity for the biosphere and human civilization to coexist. It is also defined as the process of people maintaining change in a homeostasis balanced environment, in which the exploitation of resources, the direction of investments, the orientation of technological development and institutional. It finds that fiscal sustainability could be achieved by: (i) developing a fiscal rule for the non-oil primary fiscal balance compatible with an objective for reducing the debt-to-non-oil GDP.